Prose Fiction

Prose Fiction refers to stories based in the imaginations of authors. The main purpose of imaginative literature is to interest, stimulate, instruct, and divert, not to create a precise historical record. Thus, Fiction’s essence is narration, the relating or recounting of a sequence of events or actions. They focus on one or few major characters that change and grow as a result of how they deal with other characters and how they attempt to solve their problems.

The overriding goal of writers of fiction is to tell a story and say something significant about life. The essence of fiction is characterized by the individual and psychological concerns. Fiction is strong because it is so real and personal. Characters have both first and last names; the countries and cities in which they live are visualized as real places, with real influences on the inhabitants; and their actions and interactions are like those which readers themselves have experienced, could experience, or could readily imagine themselves experiencing.

  • TYPES OF PROSE PASSAGES

Writers or authors of a fiction freely create human persons (characters) whose appearance, background, and psychological make-up are product of their free invention. They then pick-up a particular theme (or groups of theme) which is / are built on their own idea, and they compose a story, sketching a plot for the story, which surrounds the characters they have created in their imagination, they narrate serious of occurrences that will bring the whole story into bearing. Theirs is the play on words, the use of ‘heavy’ English (depending on the target readers) and certain coinage, as product of their personal imagination and thought.

 

Fiction is primarily about the interactions among people, and also some forces (like the location) that influence the ways in which characters meet and deal with their problems. Location is a backdrop or setting within which characters speak, move, and act. But more broadly, environment comprises the social, economic, and political condition that affects the outcomes of people’s lives. Fiction is distinguished from the following:

Historical accounts

Reports

Meditations

Auto(Biographies)

Letters

Personal Memoirs

Fiction includes the following:

Myths

Parables

Romances

Novels

Short Stories

 

Element of Fiction

  1. Character Brings Fiction to Life

A character may be defined as a reasonable facsimile of a human being, with all the good and bad traits of being human. Most stores are concerned with characters that are facing a major problem that develops from

  • Misunderstanding
  • Unfocused ideals and goals
  • Difficult situations
  • Troubled relationships, and
  • Generally challenging situations.

Psychology itself has grown out of the idea that people have many inborn capacities- some of them good and others bad. People encounter many problems in their lives, and they make many mistakes, they expend much effort in coping and adjusting. But they nevertheless are important and interesting and are therefore worth writing about.

      As human beings all of us share the same capacities for:

Concern

Involvement

Sympathy

Happiness

 Sorrow

Exhilaration

disappointment

 

      We are able to find endless interest in such characters and their ways of coping with their circumstances.

  1. Plot is the Plan of Fiction (as the elements governing the unfolding of the actions)
  • Structure is the knitting Together of fictions

It is the way a story is assembled, either (a) straightforward sequential order,  or (b) out-of –sequence and widely separated

Episodes

Speeches

Secondhand reports

Remembrances

Accidental discoveries

Dreams

Nightmare

Period of delirium

Fragments of letter

Overhead conversations

  
  1. Idea or Theme is the Vivifying Thought of Fiction

Whatever the types of story a writer may deal with, they are always expressing (the ideas the result(s) of general and abstract thinking) about human experience.

Types of Stories

Its Idea

Comic Stories

Human difficulties can be treated with humour.

Series Stories

In a losing situation the only winners are those who maintain honour and self-respect.

Mystery and Suspense Stories

Problems have solutions although the solution at first seem remote or even impossible

Entertainment Stories

 

 Either directly or indirectly, fiction embodies ideas and themes that underlie and give life to stories and novels. The writers never need to state their ideas in specific words, but the strength of their works depends on the power with which they exemplify ideas and make them clear.

 

  • Major Tools of Fiction

Point of view

Character,

Dialogue

Actions

Plot

Narration

Structure

Sequence

Episodes

Symbol

Style

Ironic Expressions

Protagonist (major C)

Allegory

Theme or Central idea

  1. Narration Creates the Sequence and Logic of Fiction

The object of narration is to render the story,  to make it clear and to bring it alive to the reader’s imagination through the movement of sentences through time. A narration moves in a continuous line, form word to word, scene to scene, action to action, and speech to speech.

  1. Style Is The Author’s Skill in Bringing Language to Life

To make your story wind, you need to manipulate your use of language, and apply active verbs and nouns that are specific and concrete.

  1. Point of View Guides What We See and Understand in Fiction

Point of view is the voice of the story, the speaker who does the narrating. It is the way the story establishes authenticity, either in reality or unreality. Carefully knit your stories together and look for a way to interest and engage readers by a careful control of point of view.

  1. Description Creates the World of Fiction

Description causes readers to imagine or recreate the scenes and actions of the story. (a) Physical Description (places and persons). (b) Psychological (an emotion or set of emotions).

Mood and atmosphere are important aspects of descriptive writing; they may reach the level of metaphor and symbolism.

  1. Dialogue Creates Interactions Among Fictional Characters

Through Dialogue, Fiction writers bring vividness and dramatic tension to their stories. It makes everything firsthand and real. If characters feel pain or declare love, their own words may be taken as the expression what is on their minds. We have its kinds as (a) terse and minimal dialogue, (b) expanded dialogue, considering the situation, the personalities of the character and the author’s intent.

Dialogue may concern any topic, including everyday and practical matters, personal feelings; reaction to the past, future plans, changing thoughts, sudden realizations, and political, social, philosophical or religious ideas.

The language of dialogue indicates the intelligence, articulateness, educational levels, or emotional states of the speakers. Hence the author might use: Grammatical mistake, Faulty pronunciation (to show a character of limited or disadvantaged background or a pretending character), slang, Dialect (speaker’s region in the country), Accent (speaker’s national  origin), Jargon and Cliché (self-inflation or intellectual limitations usually to create laughter), Private/Intimate Expressions (show people who are close to each other emotionally), Voiced Pauses (use to interrupt speech e.g. “er”, “ah”, “um”, “y’know”), Inappropriate words (use of -). Dialogue enables readers to know their character better.

  1. Tone and Irony Guide Our Perceptions of Fictional Works

Tone: the ways in which authors convey attitudes toward readers and also toward the work’s subject.

Component of Tone:

Irony: refers to language and situations that seem to reverse normal expectations

  • Verbal Irony (word choice): What is meant is usually the opposite of what is said.
  • Situational Irony: Circumstance in which bad things happen to good people, or in which rewards are not earned because force beyond human comprehension seem to be in total control, making the world seem arbitrary and often absurd.
  • Dramatic Irony: Characters have only a nonexistent, partial, incorrect, or misguided understanding of what is happening to them, while both readers and other characters understand the situation more fully.
  1. Symbolism and Allegory Relate Fiction to the Larger World

Symbolic value: having meanings that are beyond themselves i.e. some incidents, objects, speeches, and characters may be construed as symbols, When a complete story, in addition to maintaining its own narrative integrity, can be applied point by point to a parallel set of situations.

  1. Commentary Provides Us with an Author’s Thoughts

Instead of using commentary, recent writers use direct action and dialogue, thereby allowing readers to draw their own conclusion about meanings

  1. Narration Creates the Sequence and Logic of Fiction

The object of narration is to render the story, to make it clear and to bring it alive to the reader’s imagination through the movement of sentences through time. A narration moves in a continuous line, form word to word, scene to scene, action to action, and speech to speech.

  1. Style Is The Author’s Skill in Bringing Language to Life

To make your story wind, you need to manipulate your use of language, and apply active verbs and nouns that are specific and concrete.

  1. Point of View Guides What We See and Understand in Fiction

Point of view is the voice of the story, the speaker who does the narrating. It is the way the story establishes authenticity, either in reality or unreality. Carefully knit your stories together and look for a way to interest and engage readers by a careful control of point of view.

  1. Description Creates the World of Fiction

Description causes readers to imagine or recreate the scenes and actions of the story. (a) Physical Description (places and persons). (b) Psychological (an emotion or set of emotions).

Mood and atmosphere are important aspects of descriptive writing; they may reach the level of metaphor and symbolism.

  1. Dialogue Creates Interactions Among Fictional Characters

Through Dialogue, Fiction writers bring vividness and dramatic tension to their stories. It makes everything firsthand and real. If characters feel pain or declare love, their own words may be taken as the expression what is on their minds. We have its kinds as (a) terse and minimal dialogue, (b) expanded dialogue, considering the situation, the personalities of the character and the author’s intent.

Dialogue may concern any topic, including everyday and practical matters, personal feelings; reaction to the past, future plans, changing thoughts, sudden realizations, and political, social, philosophical or religious ideas.

The language of dialogue indicates the intelligence, articulateness, educational levels, or emotional states of the speakers. Hence the author might use: Grammatical mistake, Faulty pronunciation (to show a character of limited or disadvantaged background or a pretending character), slang, Dialect (speaker’s region in the country), Accent (speaker’s national  origin), Jargon and Cliché (self-inflation or intellectual limitations usually to create laughter), Private/Intimate Expressions (show people who are close to each other emotionally), Voiced Pauses (use to interrupt speech e.g. “er”, “ah”, “um”, “y’know”), Inappropriate words (use of -). Dialogue enables readers to know their character better.

  1. Tone and Irony Guide Our Perceptions of Fictional Works

Tone: the ways in which authors convey attitudes toward readers and also toward the work’s subject.

Component of Tone:

Irony: refers to language and situations that seem to reverse normal expectations

  • Verbal Irony (word choice): What is meant is usually the opposite of what is said.
  • Situational Irony: Circumstance in which bad things happen to good people, or in which rewards are not earned because force beyond human comprehension seem to be in total control, making the world seem arbitrary and often absurd.
  • Dramatic Irony: Characters have only a nonexistent, partial, incorrect, or misguided understanding of what is happening to them, while both readers and other characters understand the situation more fully.
  1. Symbolism and Allegory Relate Fiction to the Larger World

Symbolic value: having meanings that are beyond themselves i.e. some incidents, objects, speeches, and characters may be construed as symbols, When a complete story, in addition to maintaining its own narrative integrity, can be applied point by point to a parallel set of situations.

  1. Commentary Provides Us with an Author’s Thoughts

Instead of using commentary, recent writers use direct action and dialogue, thereby allowing readers to draw their own conclusion about meanings.

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